The Book Of Ruth
"General Introduction"

Introduction
J. Deering, AncientPath.net


The Book of Ruth - Introduction - Contents

1.  General Introduction 8 Addendum-1 Ruth VS Israel
2 The Story: (Keil and Delitzsch) 9 Addendum-2 The "Field of Boaz"
3.  The Story: (C. I. Scofield) 10 Addendum-3 Israel and The Feast Of Weeks
4 The Characters 11 Addendum-4 Salmon the Rescuer_?
5 The Full Outline with Text 12 Addendum-5 Innuendo
6 The Full Outline and Charts 13 Addendum-6 The Cycles of Fellowship
7.  Book Text in Paragraph Form W/outline 14.  Addendum-7 Literary Structure in the Book of ruth - "a must read" - Reg Grant (Bibsac)

The Book of Ruth: (The Ancient Path) General Introduction

The time:  1322-1312 B.C. (approx)
A time of national darkness - The time of the Judges, and Israel's Rebellion when: "Every man did right in his own eyes." (Judges 17:6)

The Place:  Bethlehem, Judah
The place of the birth of Jesus The Christ
The family "hometown"

Ruth gives us an insight into the domestic life of the Nation during the time of its anarchy under the rule of Gideon or Jephthah. Samuel may have been the author, but no one knows where or when it was written. This book, written on a separate scroll, was read at Pentecost, the harvest festival.

Ruth was the great-grandmother of David. This book establishes the lineage of David, the ancestor of Christ. It tells of the beginning of the Messianic family, within the Messianic nation into which over a thousand years later the Messiah was to be born.

There are some interesting things to notice in this book. Ruth was a Moabitess. These people were descendants of Lot. They were heathen. God, in establishing the family which was to produce the world’s Savior, chose a beautiful heathen girl, led her to Bethlehem and made her the bride of Boaz. This is God’s grace. He adopts the Gentiles into Christ’s family. Of course, we know that although Ruth was born a heathen, through her first husband, or Naomi, she learned of the true God.

Boaz was the son of Rahab, the harlot found in Jericho. David’s great-grandmother was a Moabitess and his great-grandfather was half Canaanite.

The book of Ruth gives to us God’s intimate story of His love for His people.

The book of Ruth has a very vivid central theme - Redemption. The first chapter introduces us to the predicament and the remainder of the book gives us wave after wave of truth concerning God's redemptive heart. Whether you look at the book from the viewpoint of the characters of the story, or its typology of the Nation of Israel, or the extended typology of the individual believer in Jesus Christ and the Body of Christ (the Church), every page abounds with truths and relationships that tell of the wonderful and graceful redemptive nature of our God.

It is best if you study the book of Ruth to do so in stages. Stage one - study the remarkable story of Naomi, Ruth and Boaz. Then move on to stage two - study the parallels between the characters of the book and the actions and relationships between Israel and the Lord God of Israel. Stage three - revisit the book once again and look for the wonderful truths that can be gleaned concerning God's amazing grace toward the one who repents (one who changes his mind - toward God and away from sin and idols) in the aspect of salvation in Jesus Christ, and also the one who is already a faithful believer but has been disobedient in temptation and sin. The former is the story of coming to Christ because you will have no other, and the latter is the story of the wayward believer who realizes his error and seeks to wholeheartedly agree with God about his sin and return to full fellowship through confession.

Ruth also gives us an insight into the domestic life of the Nation during the time of its anarchy under the rule of Gideon or Jephthah. Samuel may have been the author, but no one knows exactly where or when it was written. This book, written on a separate scroll, was read at Pentecost, the harvest festival.

Ruth was written sometime between 150 and 180 years after the events in the book as Chapter 4:22 follows the lineage through David (David dies in 1058 BC, at the age of seventy) who was High King.

Elimelech and Naomi were of the tribe of Ephraim, the son of Joseph, the son of Jacob and Rachel, the son of Sarah and Abraham (brother to Haran, whose son was Lot). They lived in the city of Bethlehem (sometimes referred to as Bethlehem-Judah). It is interesting to note that there are two Bethlehems in the scriptures and that this one is called out by name as Bethlehem “The city of Bread,” so as to not confuse it with the other Bethlehem in the North of Israel.

Ruth was the great-grandmother of David. This book establishes the lineage of David, the ancestor of Christ. It tells of the beginnings of the Messianic family (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Judah, Perez, Hezron, Ram, Amminadab, Nahshon, Salmon, Boaz) within the Messianic nation into which over a thousand years later the Messiah was to be born (Boaz, Obed, Jesse, David [Matthew 1:1-6])

([Mary’s Lineage] David, Nathan, Mattatha, Menna, Melea, Eliakim, Jonam, Joseph, Judah, Simeon, Levi, Matthat, Jorim, Eliezer, Joshua, Er, Elmadam, Cosam, Addi, Melchi, Neri, Shealtiel, Zerubbable, Resa, Johanan, Joda, Josech, Semein, Mattathias, Maath, Naggai, Hesli, Nahum, Amos, Mattathias, Joseph, Jannai, Melchi, Levi, Matthat, Eli, (Mary, the wife of) Joseph, Jesus [Luke 3:23-31]).

([Joseph’s Lineage] David, Solomon, Rehoboam, Abijah, Asa, Jehosaphat, Joram, Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, Hezekiah, Manasseh, Amon, Josiah, Jechoniah (also named Jehoiachin), Shealtiel, Zerubbabel, Abiud, Eliakim, Azor, Zadok, Achim, Eliud, Eleazar, Mathaqn, Jacob, Joseph, Jesus [Matthew 1:6-16])

Note that the two versions of the lineage of Jesus differ from Abraham to Jesus. Most scholars agree that the two lineages are that of each side of Jesus’ family. His mother’s family (Luke) is traced to show that Jesus has the human physical seed of Abraham. Even though Jesus is Virgin born He is human flesh through Mary and that human flesh was directly traceable to Abraham and gives Her family both genetic and national authority, and the Right to become KING of Israel.

Joseph’s family lineage (Matthew) is traced to show that Jesus has the national authority for inheritance of The People and The Land – but not KING. In Jeremiah 36:30 God proclaims that no member of Jehoiachin’s (Jechoniah) family will ever set on the THRONE of Israel.

The combination of the two genealogies is remarkable in that Jesus has every RIGHT to be Priest, King, and Prophet, able to be The Christ, and fulfill every demand of Scripture, even to the extent of being the descendant of Jechoniah, for while Joseph is his descendant, The Holy Spirit IS, and Joseph IS NOT the physical father of Jesus.

There are many interesting things to notice in this book. Ruth was a Moabitess. These people were descendants of Lot. They were heathen (Gentiles). God, in establishing the family which was to produce the world's Savior, chose a beautiful heathen girl, led her to Bethlehem and made her the bride of Boaz. This is God's grace. He adopts the Gentiles into Christ's family. Of course, we know that although Ruth was born a heathen, through her first husband, or Naomi, she learned of and worshiped the one true God.

Boaz was the son of Rahab, the harlot found in Jericho whose husband is Salmon who probably was one of the two spies sent into Jericho who rescued Rahab.

The book of Ruth gives to us God's intimate story of His love for His people then as now, in the Old Testament through the Nation of Israel, and in the New Testament through the Children of His Son Jesus.


The Book of Ruth - Introduction - Contents

1.  General Introduction 8 Addendum-1 Ruth VS Israel
2 The Story: (Keil and Delitzsch) 9 Addendum-2 The "Field of Boaz"
3.  The Story: (C. I. Scofield) 10 Addendum-3 Israel and The Feast Of Weeks
4 The Characters 11 Addendum-4 Salmon the Rescuer_?
5 The Full Outline with Text 12 Addendum-5 Innuendo
6 The Full Outline and Charts 13 Addendum-6 The Cycles of Fellowship
7.  Book Text in Paragraph Form W/outline 14.  Addendum-7 Literary Structure in the Book of ruth - "a must read" - Reg Grant (Bibsac)

The Book of Ruth, Bible Study, J. Deering, AncientPath.net, study materials are a ministry of AncientPath.net, and may be copied for use in Bible study groups, in limited numbers, providing that no charge is made for them.  No further distribution or use of these materials is allowable under U.S. or International Copyright Law without the express permission of AncientPath.net. 2008 AncientPath.net, All rights reserved.


2012-11-20