Understanding The Bible
STUDY REFERENCE
Clarence E. Mason's "HAMARTIOLOGY"
PART-7: HUMAN SPECULATION ABOUT SIN'S NATURE AND ORIGIN

 

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BY THE AUTHOR
Dr. Clarence E. Mason, Jr.
Philadelphia College of Bible
1970

  1. HUMAN SPECULATION ABOUT SIN'S NATURE AND ORIGIN
    1. Ancients (and many moderns) believed that sin is sensuousness.
      In this view the body is thought to be the occasion of all temptation. Hence, they taught that the instrument of sin ought to be weakened, despised, and neglected. Sensuousness refers to anything that is derived through the physical senses. The only way to get rid of sin, if this theory is true, is to get rid of the body. But, contrary to this theory, the worst of human sins are not related to the body, e.g., hatred, jealousy, unbelief, etc.

    2. Some claim that sin is merely finiteness and thus sin is due to imperfect development.
      Men creep before they walk; likewise, they sin before they learn righteousness. If this were true, the people who are most cultured, who are educated, should be more righteous than ignorant people. This is not the case. Observe also Ezekiel 28:12.Satan is spoken of here as "full of wisdom. " This view would have us believe that Satan is now as sinless as he is wise.

    3. Sin is merely selfishness.
      It is true that selfishness is sin, but it is not sufficient to say that sin is merely selfishness. These advocates say that since the greatest commandment is that we should love God, the greatest sin is to love self. It is possible there may be some sin in which selfishness does not enter at all (e.g., Eph. 5:33).

 

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