Understanding The Bible
STUDY REFERENCE
Clarence E. Mason's "Soteriology"
REPENTANCE

 

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BY THE AUTHOR
Dr. Clarence E. Mason, Jr.
Philadelphia College of Bible
1970

REPENTANCE

  1. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE SUBJECT OF REPENTANCE
    1. The first word of John the Baptist was repent (Mt. 3:1-2).
    2. Jesus began His ministry with the call to repentance (Mt. 4:17).
    3. When Christ commissioned the disciples after the resurrection, He told them that men should repent (Lk. 24:47).
    4. On the Day of Pentecost Peter used the word "repent" (Acts 2:38).
    5. The doctrine of repentance was prominent in Paul's teaching (Acts 20:21).
    6. God's command to all men everywhere is that they should repent (2 Pet. 3:9; Acts 17:30).
    7. Failure to heed God's call to repentance means that the sinner will perish (Lk. 13:3).
       
  2. THE MEANING OP THE WORD
    1. A. Old Testament words
      1. Nacham - to be comforted or eased by penitence. The primary meaning of the word is to pant, to sigh, to groan, to lament, to grieve about one's doing (Gen. 6:6; Ex. 13:17).
      2. Shub - to turn back (1 Ki. 8:47; Ezk. 14:6; 18:30).
         
    2. New Testament word
      Metanoia - to change the mind or have the mind of another (Lk. 5:32).

     

  3. THE NATURE OF REPENTANCE
    1. Repentance involves the intellect.
      Mt. 21:29; Lk. 15:18; 18:13; Acts 2:36-40
       
    2. Repentance touches the emotions.
      1. There is a sorrow for sin.
        Feelings play a real part in true godly repentance (2 Cor. 7:6-11).

        Godly sorrow is not repentance. Godly sorrow will produce repentance (v.10). In this verse repentance means "to be a care to one afterwards, " "to cause one great concern."

        Luke 18:13, "the publican beat his breast, " indicating sorrow of heart.

        Psalm 38:18, "I will declare my iniquity. I will be sorry for my sin. " All true repentance is accompanied by heart emotion, even though it is not visible.

        "Remorse is sorrow for the consequences of sin, but repentance condemns the sin which brought the consequences. Tears are in the eyes of repentance, confession is on its lips. God's mind about sin is in its thoughts, walking from sin is its way, brokenness is in its heart, taking hold of Christ are its hands, and humbleness of manner is its attitude."
        E. H. Bancroft, Elemental Theology, p. 191
         
      2. There is a hatred of sin.
        Psalm 97:10, "Ye that love the Lord, hate evil."
         
    3. Repentance includes the will.
      Repentance involves the formation of a new purpose with reference to sin and God's will (Lk. 15:18-20).

      Repentance is not only a heart broken FOR sin, but FROM sin as well. We must forsake what we would have God forgive (Prov. 28:13).

      The will and the intellect are closely associated. A real change of mind towards God and sin also necessitates a real purpose respecting them.
       
  4. THE MANIFESTATION OF REPENTANCE
    1. By confession of sin to God.
      Ps. 38:18; 32:3-5; Lk. 15:21;Jas. 5:16; Mt. 5:23-24
       
    2. In forsaking of sin (Isa. 55:7).
    3. In turning unto God (1 Thes. 1:9).
       
  5. THE SOURCE OF REPENTANCE
    1. A. It is through the working of God.
      Mt. 12:41, cp. Jn. 1:1-2; Acts 5:30-31; 11:18; 2 Tim. 2:25
    2. It is through the Word of God.
      Acts 2:37-38,41; 2 Tim. 2:24-25; Jn. 3:5-10
    3. The goodness of God brings repentance.
      Rom. 2:4
    4. Through reproof and chastisement.
      Rev. 3:19; Heb. 12:6,10-11
    5. Through a brother's reproof.
      2 Tim. 2:24-25; Gal. 6:1
       
  6. THE RESULTS OF REPENTANCE
    1. Joy in heaven.
      Lk. 15:7,10; 2 Pet. 3:9
    2. Pardon and forgiveness.
      Isa. 55:6-7
    3. Reception of the Holy Spirit.
      Acts 2:38
    4. Seasons of refreshing from the Lord.
      Acts 3:19
       
  7. DEFINITION
    Repentance is that work of God which results in a change of mind in respect of man's relations to God. It is neither sorrow nor penitence, though penitent sorrow may produce repentance, and it is always an element in saving faith. (Some have described it as the negative aspect of saving faith.).




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