THE BOOK OF 2 THESSALONIANS
CHAPTER 3 - "You Can Keep At It"

Reference Collection, Edited by Ray Kendzierski

Various Authors, Edited as reference material [1]


2 Thessalonians Quick Summary

KEY THOUGHT NO. OF CHAPTERS KEY VERSE CHRIST SEEN AS
Waiting For Christ 3 2 Thess. 3:5 The Coming Lord
 
WRITER DATE CONCLUSION  
The Apostle Paul A.D. 54 The Christian is to wait, watch and work for the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ, when He shall be glorified in His saints and His saints shall be eternally satisfied in Him


YOU CAN KEEP AT IT                                                          
Lesson Passages: II Thess. 3:1-18

Chapter 3 Summarized:

Contents: Paul’s encouragements and exhortations to the Thessalonians.

Conclusion: It is required of those who have professed Christianity, that they live according to the precepts of the Gospel, that they be not accounted disorderly persons devoid of the divine love and hope which they process. If Christ is allowed to direct our love upon Himself, it will rectify all our affections toward men and keep us in the attitude of expectation of His momentary coming.

Key Word:   Apostolic commands, v. 6.

Strong verses:  5, 6, 13.

Promise:  v. 3.

Christ Seen:  v. 5.  Patient waiting for Christ is to be joined with the love of God.  The hope of His return is the great incentive to a busy life and a life of loving deeds to others.

Introduction: In the close of the foregoing chapter, the apostle had prayed earnestly for the Thessalonians, and now he desires their prayers, encouraging them to trust in God, to which he subjoins another petition for them (v. 1-5). He then proceeds to give them commands and directions for correcting some things he was informed were amiss among them (v. 6-15) and concludes with benedictions and prayers (v. 16-18).


PRAY FOR MISSIONARIES (2 Thess. 3:1-3).

Finally, brethren, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may have free course, and be glorified, even as it is with you. 2 And that we may be delivered from unreasonable and wicked men: for all men have not faith. 3 But the Lord is faithful, who shall stablish you, and keep you from evil.

Verse 1:
Finally, brethren, pray for us, that the word of the Lord may have free course, and be glorified, even as it is with you. 

Finally: But, furthermore, to come to a conclusion, or what remains is this.

Pray for us: God, in the order of his grace and providence, has made even the success of his Gospel dependent, in a certain measure, on the prayers of his followers. Why he should do so we cannot tell, but that he has done so we know; and they are not a little criminal who neglect to make fervent supplications for the prosperity of the cause of God.

That the Word may have free course: The idea is that it might spread rapidly. That it will not meet with any obstruction, that every hindrance is removed.

and be glorified - receive glory, be honored, by being accepted by those who hear.

As it is with you - It is evident from this that Paul met with some obstructions in preaching the gospel where he was then laboring. What they were, he mentions in the next verse. He was then at Corinth and the history in the Acts 18 informs us of the difficulties which he had to encounter there.

Verse 2:
And that we may be delivered from unreasonable and wicked men: for all men have not faith.

Unreasonable: Disorderly, unmanageable, not having any discipline in their lives. They cared nothing for the laws about them.

Have not faith - or as Greek, "the faith" of the Christian: the only antidote to what is "unreasonable and wicked." The Thessalonians, from their ready acceptance of the Gospel (1Th 1:5, 6), might think "all" would similarly receive it; but the Jews were far from having such a readiness to believe the truth.


PERSIST IN FAITHFULNESS (2 Thess. 3: 3-5)

But the Lord is faithful, who shall stablish you, and keep you from evil. 4 And we have confidence in the Lord touching you, that ye both do and will do the things which we command you. 5 And the Lord direct your hearts into the love of God, and into the patient waiting for Christ.

Verse 3:
But the Lord is faithful, who shall stablish you, and keep you from evil.

Faithful: Though mankind can’t always be trusted, God is always faithful to His promises and purposes. He may always be confided in; and when people are unbelieving, perverse, and disposed to do us wrong, we may go to Him and be assured of one we can count on for His help and protection.

Stablish you: Though it was on himself that the wicked men were making their onset, he turns away from asking the Thessalonians’ prayers for his deliverance to express his assurance of their establishment in the faith.

From evil: Preservation from the evil one or wicked one, meaning Satan.

Verse 4:
And we have confidence in the Lord touching you, that ye both do and will do the things which we command you.

And we have confidence in the Lord - Not primarily in you, for you have hearts like others, but in the Lord. It is remarkable that when Paul expresses the utmost confidence in Christians that they will live and act as becomes their profession, his reliance is not on anything in themselves, but wholly on the faithfulness of God. He must be a stranger to the human heart who puts much confidence in it even in its best state.

Verse 5:
And the Lord direct your hearts into the love of God, and into the patient waiting for Christ.

The “Lord”: If this is a reference to the Holy Spirit (2 Cor. 3:17) we have the trinity in this verse.

direct your hearts into the love of God - The love of God is the grand motive and principle of obedience; this must occupy your hearts: the heart is irregular in all its workings; God alone, by his Spirit, can direct it into his love, and keep it right; give a proper direction to all its passions, and keep them in order, regularity and purity.

patient waiting for Christ—The Greek is the “patience (endurance) of Christ” (2:41 Thess. 1:3). Christ set the example (Alford).


PURSUE RESPONSIBLE BEHAVIOR (2 Thess. 3:6—12)

Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye withdraw yourselves from every brother that walketh disorderly, and not after the tradition which he received of us. 7 For yourselves know how ye ought to follow us: for we behaved not ourselves disorderly among you. 8 Neither did we eat any man’s bread for nought; but wrought with labour and travail night and day, that we might not be chargeable to any of you. 9 Not because we have not power, but to make ourselves an ensample unto you to follow us. 10 For even when we were with you, this we commanded you, that if any would not work, neither should he eat. 11 For we hear that there are some which walk among you disorderly, working not at all, but are busybodies. 12 Now them that are such we command and exhort by our Lord Jesus Christ, that with quietness they work, and eat their own bread.

Verse 6:
Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye withdraw yourselves from every brother that walketh disorderly, and not after the tradition which he received of us.

we command you - Paul had expressed faith in their obedience (3:4); here he put it to a particular test.

withdraw - Paul had addressed the same problem in 1 Thessalonians 5:14, but now that it had gotten more out of hand he had to use stricter discipline. 

walketh disorderly - lives in idleness. Some of the Thessalonians, anticipating the Lord’s imminent return, stopped their regular employment.

the tradition which he received of us:  the oral instruction which he had given to them. 

Verse 7:
For yourselves know how ye ought to follow us: for we behaved not ourselves disorderly among you.

For yourselves know how ye ought to follow us: You know what you should do in order to imitate us.

We behaved not ourselves disorderly: We did not go out of our rank; we kept our place, and discharged all its duties.

Verse 8:

Neither did we eat any man’s bread for nought; but wrought with labour and travail night and day, that we might not be chargeable to any of you.

Neither did we eat any man’s bread for naught:  We labored with our hands and paid for everything we needed. We never allowed our calling and to take advantage of you.

Labour and travail night and day - we were incessantly employed, either in preaching the Gospel, visiting from house to house, or working at our calling.

Verse 9:
Not because we have not power, but to make ourselves an ensample unto you to follow us.

Not because we have not power - we have the power, the right, to be maintained by those in whose behalf we labor. The laborer is worthy of his hire, is a maxim universally acknowledged and respected; and they who preach the Gospel should live by the Gospel: the apostle did not claim his privilege, but labored for his own support, that he might be an example to those whom he found otherwise disposed.

Verse 10:
For even when we were with you, this we commanded you, that if any would not work, neither should he eat.

This verse interprets itself. You don’t work, you don’t eat. We gave you the example by working among you when we were with you.

Verse 11:
For we hear that there are some which walk among you disorderly, working not at all, but are busybodies.

It is not known in what way this was made known to Paul, whether by Timothy or someone else. There were some among them that were living contrary to the rules of Christ. As we saw earlier these were ones that would not abide by any law. They were lazy, lounging at home, becoming religious gossips. They were meddling in every one else’s business, causing problems among the congregation.

Verse 12:
Now them that are such we command and exhort by our Lord Jesus Christ, that with quietness they work, and eat their own bread.

Here Paul tells them to quit acting like the world, to make less noise and more work. Work hard enough to buy and eat your own bread, not your neighbor’s.

PRESERVE IN DOING WELL (2 Thess. 3:13—18)

Verse 13:
But ye, brethren, be not weary in well doing.

“Faint not.” The Greek means, properly, to turn out a coward; then to be faint-hearted, to despond. The idea is, that they were not to be discouraged from doing good to the truly worthy and deserving by the idleness and improper conduct of some who asked their assistance.

Verse 14:
And if any man obey not our word by this epistle, note that man, and have no company with him, that he may be ashamed.

If any man obey not - They had disobeyed his word in the first epistle, and the Church still continued to bear with them; now he tells the Church, if they still continue to disregard what is said to them, and particularly his word by this second epistle, they are to mark them as being totally incorrigible, and have no fellowship with them.

That he may be ashamed - The Greek reads, “he may be made to turn and look into himself” - in other words, be forced into healthy introspection.

Verse 15:
Yet count him not as an enemy, but admonish him as a brother.

Consider him more of an enemy to himself than to you and encourage him to do what’s right.

Verse 16:
Now the Lord of peace himself give you peace always by all means. The Lord be with you all.

Lord of peace - The same title is given to Christ as to the Father, the “God of Peace” (Rom. 15:3316:202 Cor. 13:11).

peace - This is the peace which he alone can give; inward and outward, now and in the future (Rom. 14:17).

always - at all times.

by all means - in every way.

The Lord be with you all - This is agreeable to the promise of our Lord: Lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world; Matthew 28:20. May the Lord, who has promised to be always with his true disciples, be with you!

Verse 17:
The salutation of Paul with mine own hand, which is the token in every epistle: so I write.

The salutation of Paul with mine own hand - “Which is the token in every epistle.” Greek: “sign.” That is, this signature is a sign or proof of the genuineness of the epistle.

So I write - Referring, probably, to some mark or method which Paul had of signing his name, which was well known, and which would easily be recognized by them.

Verse 18:
The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen.

Paul closes all of his letters by praying for grace to those he addresses.


[1] This lesson was prepared using the following:

Barns, Barns Notes on the New Testament;
Brooks, Keith L., The Summarized Bible, Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, Reprinted in 1965 from the original printing of 1919, with permission of Mrs. Brooks;
Clark, Adam, Commentary on the N. T.;
Matthew Henry's Commentary, 6 volumes. Fleming H. Revell Co.;
Gospel Hour, The, Inc., Copyright 1964, Greenville, South Carolina;
Green, Oliver B., The Epistles of Paul to The Thessalonians
Vines Expository word study
: Fleming H. Revell Co., Westwood, N. J. 1940--1966
Walvoord, John F., The Thessalonians Epistles, Zondevan Book, Grand Rapids, 1967.;

Computer Bible Software:
        QuickVerse:
                Matthew Henry's, New Commentary on the Whole Bible,
                Adam Clark's Commentary on the Bible.
        Bible Explore 4.0:
                Strong's Talking Dictionary;
        The sword Project software:
                Barn's note on the New Testament.,
        e-Sword software:
                Vincent's word study.;

All scripture is from the King James Version.


The Book of 2 Thessalonians, Edited Bible Study, Ray Kendzierski Reference Collection study materials are a ministry of AncientPath.net, and may be copied for use in Bible study groups, in limited numbers, providing that no charge is made for them.  No further distribution or use of these materials is allowable under U.S. or International Copyright Law.


53_2thess_3_study.htm
2012-11-23